Nautic Star 210 Coastal - Boat Review

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NauticStar 210 Coastal
Jim Barron
Trailer Boats
April 13th 2011
 

When we see a boat with “coastal” in its name, we generally think of a bay boat aimed primarily at the fisherman. It is usually a solid-white hull and deck with a white interior and plenty of fishing amenities, not to mention a few creature comforts. 

The NauticStar 210 Coastal takes this moniker in a different direction. With a wide flairing bow and a unique forward sponson arrangement, this outboard-powered 21-footer combines the creature comforts of a deck boat with generous fishing features you’d normally find on a bay boat. 

This hybrid approach includes a bow deck with an anchor locker and deck plate for a pedestal fishing chair. The forward deck area is expansive with room for seven people—two ahead of the center console and five on the removable cushions with backrests that wrap around the bow. 

An insulated ice chest and storage is located under the bow cushions, and the forward sole features a recessed livewell and another deck plate for a removable cocktail table. 

The console includes a 20-gallon livewell under the padded forward seat. In our test boat, the helm of the console featured a JBL marine audio system and a Humminbird 728 fishfinder—both optional. 

Instrumentation is simple with a tachometer, speedometer and fuel gauge. The electrical panel also is basic with one accessory switch and room for additional switches, if needed. Teleflex No Feedback cable steering is standard, but Teleflex BayStar hydraulic steering is optional— an upgrade we highly recommend with outboards in excess of 115 hp. 

Seating for the captain and mate consists of an upholstered, flip-flop seat back on a padded 72-quart ice chest. When it comes to rod storage, there are six vertical holders, three on each side of the console. There are also six horizontal rod holders, three under each gunwale. 

Three fold-down, upholstered jump seats are mounted across the stern. An additional 27-gallon livewell is mounted under the center seat. Access to batteries and rigging occupies the remaining underseat storage. Drink holders are mounted between the seats. With the seat backs down, the flat rear deck has provisions for mounting two additional pedestal fishing chairs. 

The boat’s top speed is over 48 mph and its acceleration is strong at 5.5 seconds from zero to 30 mph. With a 14-degree deadrise at the stern and a relatively flat bottom design, the 20-footer comes on plane quickly with very little bow rise. 

Nautic Star Coastal Bay Boat

Out test conditions consisted of a moderate 12- to 18-inch chop on the Indian River near Stuart, Fla. And while we expected a bit of pounding from the modest deadrise at the transom, we found the overall riding qualities of the hull to be surprisingly smooth. 

Handling was very predictable. The hull tracks straight at idling speeds with no tendency to wander from side to side. At planing speeds, the model banks modestly into turns without any tendency to slide outward or catch an outside chine. 

Power trim has a limited effect on the attitude of the hull, but the 150-hp Yamaha four-stroke on our test boat was enough to get the sponsons up and allow the hull’s chine vents to work as intended. 

Our test numbers bear out the hull’s efficiency. We achieved a remarkable best fuel economy of 5.3 mpg at 20 mph. 

The NauticStar 210 Coastal is indeed an interesting boat, primarily in the way it combines the features of an inshore bay boat with the creature comforts of a deck boat—a design that will please both anglers and non-anglers in any family. 

Air Apparent 

I was quick to point out the unique bow sponsons of the NauticStar 210 Coastal in my review. The company refers to this design as an “Air Assisted Chine” configuration. 

At first glance, the 210 appears to be riding on a tri-hull design. This feature contributes to the wide flairing bow that enhances interior space, particularly up front. 

Nautic Star Bay Boat

But unlike a tri-hull that tries to force air under the hull to cushion the ride, the forward sponsons on the NauticStar 210 Coastal vent air out the sides along the chines. 

The practical effect of this design is that it provides the stability of a tri-hull at rest; yet when on plane, the hull allows air trapped between the sponsons and the main hull to escape out the vent instead of building pressure under the hull, which can add drag. 

Considering the top speed of the hull (48.3 mph), the size of the boat and the horsepower applied, the Air Assisted Chine design seems to work very well indeed. 

SPECIFICATIONS 

Price as tested $41,892  (MSRP)

Length/beam 20'4"/8'2" 

Deadrise at transom 16 degrees 

Weight (hull only) 2,100 lbs. 

Fuel capacity 35 gals. 

Maximum horsepower 150 

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ENGINE AS TESTED 

Make Yamaha F150TXR 

Horsepower/no. of cylinders 150/I-4 

Displacement 2.7L (163 cid) 

Induction EFI four-stroke 

Weight 487 lbs. 

Gear ratio 2.00:1 

WOT rpm range 5000-6000 

Propeller 14¼ x 18" stainless three-blade 

TEST RESULTS 

Top speed (mph) 48.3 

0-30-mph acceleration (seconds) 5.5 

NauticStar, Dept. TBM, P.O. Box 26, Amory, MS 38821; 662/256-5636; nauticstarboats.com 

Yamaha Motor Corp., Dept. TBM, 1270 Chastain Rd. N.W., Kennesaw, GA 30144; 800/889-2624; yamaha-motor.com